Recover from Pain and Injuries Quicker at Premier Physical Therapy

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Physical Therapy in Seabrook Island, SC

Accidents are a part of life that can happen anytime, anywhere. Whether it's at work, home, or on the road, injuries often follow. According to the CDC, there were more than 38 million injury-related visits to the ER in 2020. However, not all injuries require the same kind of treatment. Minor sprains and bruises can often be treated at home with rest, ice, and elevation.

More severe injuries require ongoing care like sports rehab and physical therapy in Seabrook Island, SC. Physical therapy, which is a combination of physical exercises and education, has remarkable benefits for those who are injured or in constant pain. For many patients, physical therapy is the key to a pain-free life where joints and muscles don't ache and everyday activities are easy to accomplish without constant worry and debilitating pain. That's where Premier Physical Therapy shines – to help you live life free of the aches and pains setting you back.

Service Areas

A Unique Approach to Physical Therapy in Seabrook Island, SC

Premier Physical Therapy is not your ordinary physical therapy center. We separate ourselves from other physical therapy offices with an inherent belief that God's Will is to see each and every person suffering from physical ailments return to the best shape possible. We believe it's our job to make sure His Will is seen through. To ensure we do so, our physical therapy center is equipped with the most advanced technology and knowledgeable staff in South Carolina.

Some of the most popular services we offer at our physical rehabilitation office in South Carolina include:

  • Physical Therapy
  • Alter-G Treadmill
  • Aquatic Therapy
  • Sports Rehab for Athletes

Our Mission

At Premier Physical Therapy, we strive to use our abilities to help others and honor God. We believe that each person has unique gifts that they can use to make a positive impact in the world, and for us, that gift is the ability to heal and serve people through advanced physical

therapy techniques and technology. Whether you are dealing with a minor injury or a chronic condition, we are here to help you feel better and improve your overall well-being.

Now that you know a little more about our mission, let's take a closer look at the services offered at our physical therapy center.

Elevating the Art and Science of Physical Therapy in Seabrook Island, SC

Our services are focused on helping individuals alleviate any physical discomfort they may be experiencing by working in tandem with their bodies. Physical therapy is a unique combination of both science and art, and our team of experts is well-versed in both aspects to ensure that regardless of your symptoms or diagnosis, you receive the best care possible.

Our understanding of human anatomy is second nature to us, but we also understand that each person's body is unique. Thus, we approach each case with a willingness to adapt and tailor our methods to your specific needs, enabling you to get back to living your best life once again.

 Physical Rehabilitation Seabrook Island, SC
Therapy Customized

Physical Therapy Customized to Your Needs and Goals

Premier Physical Therapy works with you to develop a personalized rehabilitation program that caters to your specific needs and objectives. Whether you are suffering from the fallout of shoulder surgery, knee replacement surgery, or your back has artificial discs, you deserve a customized rehabilitation plan.

That's why we create specialized plans for every one of our clients – we never provide treatment based on someone's general characteristics or levels of pain. Plus, unlike many physical therapy centers, our team undergoes advanced training in the Mulligan Concept and McKenzie Method. The bottom line At Premier Physical Therapy, you can rely on receiving compassionate, complete support using the latest physical therapy techniques and equipment, such as dry needling.

utilize technologies

We also utilize technologies such as the Alter-G Unweighting System and Pneumex Unweighting System.

The Pneumex unweighting system is designed to decrease pain and increase strength by providing controlled, precise, weightless motion for the spine or injured joint. Premier Physical Therapy is the sole provider in the Seabrook Island, SC, area to offer this pain-free Pneumex technology.

clinic provides

Our physical therapy clinic provides relief for nearly every area of your body, including your:

  • Back
  • Shoulders
  • Neck
  • Jaw
  • Spine
  • Hips
  • Ankles and Feet
  • Knees
  • Elbows
practitioners

Our team of practitioners also provides care for diseases and disorders, such as:

  • Arthritis
  • Fibromyalgia
  • Plantar Fasciitis
  • Multiple Sclerosis
  • Chronic Pain Disorders
  • Parkinson's

From high-level sports injuries to painful sprains, you can rest easy knowing that relief is just around the corner when you book an appointment with Premier Physical Therapy.

Reduce Impacts and Reimagine Rehabilitation with the Alter G

The Alter G treadmill is a remarkable piece of technology that helps reduce the impact of exercise and aids in smooth rehabilitation after surgery or injury. It is especially useful if walking, jogging, or running causes pain during recovery from physical ailments. Alter G treadmills are preferred by leading medical professionals and the world's best athletes and sports teams.

Originally developed at NASA and tested at Nike's Oregon Research Project by America's top distance runners, the Alter G was considered revolutionary when first produced. Today, it remains incredibly effective and exists as the only FDA-approved device of its kind.

Top 3 Benefits of Alter G Treadmills for Physical Therapy in Charleston

One of the most common questions we get at Premier Physical Therapy about Alter G treadmills is whether they really work or not. We get it – antigravity technology may seem out of place in a custom physical therapy program. The truth is that Alter G provides patients with an exciting, effective, and proven way to improve their workouts and recoveries. Here are just a few of the biggest benefits of using antigravity treadmills at our physical therapy office:

 Physiotherapy Seabrook Island, SC

Running on a traditional treadmill is a popular exercise, but it can also cause harm to your bones, joints, and muscles due to the high stress and pressure on your body. Antigravity treadmills solve this issue by using unweighting technology to help users achieve their desired workout. The AlterG can unweight up to 80% of a user's body weight, reducing stress and shock on the lower body

By wearing specialized shorts and entering the air chamber surrounding the Alter G treadmill, the machine can be calibrated to pressurize the chamber and unweight users, allowing them to run without pain and without interfering with their natural gait mechanics. This technology isn't just for athletes. It can be used for a range of physiotherapy needs, whether you're recovering from knee surgery or simply want to run without harming your knees as much.

 Antigravity Treadmill Seabrook Island, SC

The Alter G treadmill provides a painless, low-weight exercise for patients in early recovery. Studies show it reduces muscle atrophy and swelling and improves post-surgery results. It helps you recuperate faster and improves cardio fitness, range of motion, and strength while reducing the harmful effects of gravity. Going through recovery doesn't mean you have to waste away on the couch. Instead, you can stay active and exercise with the painless treatment Alter G from Premier Physical Therapy in South Carolina.

 Aquatic Therapy Seabrook Island, SC

The Alter G treadmill may sound intimidating, but it is a safe and comfortable experience for helping patients recover from injury or surgery. While using the Alter G, you will be surrounded by a safety bar that can be used for support and balance. A clinician from Premier Physical Therapy will be present to guide you through your run, adjusting your speed and pressure to create the ideal running experience. Patients who use the Alter G Treadmill can focus on getting the most out of their workout rather than worrying about falling or joint pain.

Stay Active with Aquatic Therapy

Depending on your pain symptoms and goals for physical therapy in Seabrook Island, SC, aquatic therapy can provide your body with immeasurable benefits. It all starts when by heating our pool to 92 degrees, to maximize your workout and keep your muscles warm. In fact, at Premier Physical Therapy, we're proud to provide patients with the warmest pool in Charleston. When you use our aquatic therapy technology, you have access to two underwater treadmills and also a pair of swim jets. Plus, we can provide accessories such as weights, jog belts, steps, and even resistance bands.

Benefits of using our aquatic therapy clinic include

  • Decreased Muscle Guarding
  • Reduced Pain
  • Un-Weighted Joints
  • Much More
Physical Therapy Seabrook Island, SC

Why Choose Aquatic Therapy

 Physical Rehabilitation Seabrook Island, SC

5 Reasons to Consider Aquatic Therapy from Premier Physical Therapy

Aquatic exercises from our physical therapy office is about more than just swimming laps. It is an effective and safe form of physical therapy that uses evidence-based techniques to help you feel and move better, whether you're 25 or 65. Curious why you should consider this service? Keep reading to find out.

Reduced Risk of Falling
Reduced Risk of Falling

Certain patients who experience problems with balance and stability might not be suitable for physical therapy on land. However, aquatic therapy decreases the likelihood of falls and fall-related injuries, enabling them to exercise and recover in a secure environment. With time, balance issues can be resolved, and confidence can be regained.

Coordination
Coordination and Balance Improvements

To piggyback off of our last point, aquatic therapy is a type of physical therapy in Seabrook Island, SC, that can help patients improve their coordination and balance. This, in turn, can reduce their risk of falls outside of the pool. The water used in aquatic therapy slows down movement and prevents falls, which gives patients the time they need to regain their posture if they get off balance. Research has shown that hydrotherapy can be particularly beneficial for older patients, as it can help them improve their balance and recovery. As a result, they may become less fearful of falling and more confident during physical activities.

Less Stress on Your Joints and Bones
Less Stress on Your Joints and Bones

When a patient is immersed in water up to their neck, their body weight is reduced by nearly 90%. This buoyancy helps to decrease the load on weight-bearing muscles, bones, and joints. This is particularly beneficial for individuals with musculoskeletal conditions or injuries, as landing on a hard surface could be unsafe or painful.

Improve Your Cardio
Improve Your Cardio

Exercising in a pool can significantly improve one's aerobic capacity and breathing, which in turn promotes overall health. In particular, engaging in aerobic exercise can lower the risk of coronary artery disease and help maintain healthy blood pressure levels. This makes it an ideal form of physical activity for patients who require aerobic exercise but face mobility or pain issues that limit their ability to engage in land-based exercise.

Help Alleviate Swollen Joints
Help Alleviate Swollen Joints

Hydrostatic pressure refers to the pressure exerted by fluids that are confined in a space. When a person undergoes aquatic physical therapy, the water surrounding their body exerts hydrostatic pressure. This pressure helps to improve circulation, reduce swelling, decrease joint stiffness, and increase overall mobility.

 Physiotherapy Seabrook Island, SC

Custom Sports Conditioning and Strengthening

There's a reason why some of the best athletes in the world come to Premier Physical Therapy for help: We strive to combine the best staff with the best equipment you'll find in South Carolina or anywhere else. Our sports training program is tailored to meet the needs of athletes from any sport. It is designed to help prevent injuries and facilitate a quick return to the field.

Each workout targets speed, strength, power, agility, and weight loss, if necessary. You will have full access to our 5,000-square-foot facility, which includes an indoor, heated, saltwater aqua therapy pool to assist with soreness and improve flexibility. Before progressing to the next level, you will need to pass a functional exam with a specific goal in mind.

Some of the sports physical therapy programs we offer include:

  • Core Strengthening for Improved Performance Across Multiple Sports
  • Upper Extremity Conditioning for Softball, Baseball, Swimming, & Volleyball
  • Speed Programs
  • Vertical Jump Programs
  • Premier Pitching Academy Program
  • Golf Conditioning Program
  • Marathon, Triathlon, & Century Training Program

You with Our Health and Wellness Services

We believe that one of the best ways to maintain the gains you make with physical therapy in Charleston is to stay active and stay healthy once you're discharged from our physical rehabilitation in South Carolina. After all, regular exercise is often the best medicine you can take.

How does it work, you might be asking?

We offer you the opportunity to have unlimited visits to our 5,000-square-foot facility for an affordable monthly fee. You'll be able to schedule up to two weekly appointments for our heated pool and unlimited appointments for our gym facility. There are no lock-in contracts, and you can cancel anytime you'd like. Our facility is less crowded than regular gyms, and our therapists are always available to assist you. You'll feel comfortable knowing that if you have any questions or concerns, we're always here to help.

The Path to Pain Relief Begins at Premier Physical Therapy

If you're suffering from a physical ailment and would like to return to peak physical condition, Premier Physical Therapy is here to help you. From arthritis to Parkinson's and just about everything in between, our custom programs don't just provide relief from your symptoms – they address the root causes of your issues. Our team of experts is incredibly well-versed in healing every area of the human anatomy – from your feet to your shoulders. Contact our physiotherapy office today and let us help you become the best possible version of yourself.

Latest News in Seabrook Island, SC

Seabrook Island short-term rental petition won’t change outcome, town says

SEABROOK ISLAND, S.C. (WCSC) - A potential short-term rental ordinance on Seabrook Island has some residents signing a petition in hopes the town will decide not to cap the number of short-term rentals.David Sweet, a Seabrook Island resident, gathered over 500 signatures on a petition for the town not to put a cap on short-term rentals, but the town says the opinions they’ve gathered are already enough.“I’ve come to the conclusion that caps aren’t needed because ...

SEABROOK ISLAND, S.C. (WCSC) - A potential short-term rental ordinance on Seabrook Island has some residents signing a petition in hopes the town will decide not to cap the number of short-term rentals.

David Sweet, a Seabrook Island resident, gathered over 500 signatures on a petition for the town not to put a cap on short-term rentals, but the town says the opinions they’ve gathered are already enough.

“I’ve come to the conclusion that caps aren’t needed because the data that the town’s provided to you,” Sweet says. “...Doesn’t bare out the need for caps.”

Sweet says he’s kept his property as a short-term rental since owning it in May 2021. He says that owning comes with a large price tag because it’s mandatory to join the Seabrook Island Club for seven years when first buying property.

Since 2021, the minimum joining fee went from $3,600 to $15,000. The most expensive membership went from $33,000 to $70,000.

Sweet also started a petition to see how many other residents are against any potential cap on STRs.

“What most owners are concerned about is what’s it going to do to property values on the island?” Sweet says. “And what’s it going to do to real estate sales on the island?... Real estate sales help drive that next level of future owners and future club members.”

Darryl May, short-term rental committee chair and town councilperson, says the committee has received over 450 written public comments and about 100 in-person comments.

“No disrespect intended, but I don’t think the petition provides any additional information than what we set out to get and did get ourselves,” May says.

The purpose of this committee is to study short-term rental activities and trends within the town. This could involve limiting the number of short-term rentals, limiting the ownership of multiple short-term rentals, what fees are reasonable, etc.

Seabrook Island is home to 2,345 family homes and villas and 588 of those are short-term rentals, according to the town.

May says, so far, the committee has made mostly unanimous decisions on recommendations they plan to take to council in June. These include setting a noise ordinance at 10 p.m., banning recreational-use drones and enacting a stricter trash removal process for all Seabrook Islanders. Short-term rental owners could see a reduction in occupancy and parking.

He says in the next workshop, they will discuss how they plan to enforce these recommendations. The last two workshops will talk about whether or not they need a short-term rental cap.

“We are not going to do something that we think will deter people from coming here,” May says. “...We want to accommodate everyone but do it in a way that preserves Seabrook’s future growth.

The committee says they plan to bring all recommendations to the town council in June before they make the final call.

Click here for the full schedule of the last short-term rental committee workshops.

Read below for a breakdown of membership fees to the Seabrook Island Club from 2020-2024, or click here.

Seabrook Island Club fees breakdown by Live 5 News on Scribd

Copyright 2024 WCSC. All rights reserved.

As a stunning shorebird sanctuary vanishes, SC wildlife officials resist protections

Two boats full of birders floated slowly down the North Edisto River as the sun set and the moon popped up from a hat-shaped cloud. Ahead was Deveaux Bank, a rapidly vanishing island that’s among the most important bird sanctuaries on the East Coast.The birders were there on this recent April evening to glimpse a migratory wonder, one that South Carolina scientists had only recently discovered: the return of the whimbrels.Whimbrels are large shorebirds with speckled brown-and-white feathers. They have long curved bills, p...

Two boats full of birders floated slowly down the North Edisto River as the sun set and the moon popped up from a hat-shaped cloud. Ahead was Deveaux Bank, a rapidly vanishing island that’s among the most important bird sanctuaries on the East Coast.

The birders were there on this recent April evening to glimpse a migratory wonder, one that South Carolina scientists had only recently discovered: the return of the whimbrels.

Whimbrels are large shorebirds with speckled brown-and-white feathers. They have long curved bills, perfect for feeding on insects and Lowcountry fiddler crabs. They're long-distance fliers, sometimes migrating nonstop from the southern tip of South America to Deveaux Bank.

Special Reports

Here on this horseshoe-shaped patch of sand, whimbrels roost for a few weeks in mid-spring, resting for their next long flight to the Arctic. In 2009, scientists in Virginia captured a female whimbrel and attached a transmitter. They named the bird Hope and tracked her for three years. Hope flew more than 50,000 miles.

Like many shorebirds, whimbrels are in trouble. Various studies have found their numbers roughly cut in half since the 1990s. Which is why Deveaux Bank has become so precious.

It’s also why Chris Crolley, who runs Coastal Expeditions, wanted to take the birders to this beautiful and disappearing way station.

Whimbrel discovery

The boats left a landing on Wadmalaw Island as the early evening sun cast the marsh in amber. About 75 people were on board, many lugging binoculars and cameras with long lenses. The boats puttered past Rockville, a tiny town on Wadmalaw Island with residents who have long used Deveaux Bank as a place to picnic or fish. “See that,” Crolley suddenly said as the boat moved into the North Edisto River. “Flying across the sun — whimbrels!”

They flew in ragged formation, possibly from nearby marshlands where they had fed.

“They might fly nonstop from Argentina. And when they land here, they’re two things — tired and hungry,” Crolley told the group. “They’ll rest and feed here and become even more beautiful than they were when they arrived.”

To the left, windows on Seabrook Island’s beachside homes reflected the setting sun. To the right, the silhouetted and preserved forests of Botany Bay grew darker. Ahead, at the North Edisto's mouth, was Deveaux Bank, the site of a surprising revelation.

For years, scientists weren’t sure where whimbrels stopped during their epic journeys north. Then, one morning in 2014, Felicia Sanders, a biologist with the state Department of Natural Resources, noticed whimbrels leaving Deveaux Bank. Did some whimbrels use Deveaux as their secret way station?

Over time, she and her colleagues gathered more data, and on a full moon night in 2019, they did a comprehensive tally: More than 20,000 whimbrels were on Deveaux, about half the known Atlantic population. They'd been hiding in plain sight. After the count, John Fitzpatrick of the Cornell Lab of Ornithology, told The New York Times it “was one of the most mind-blowing discoveries in the history of 20th- and 21st-century ornithology.”

At that time, Deveaux Bank was more than 200 acres.

But as the boats closed in on this late April evening, it soon became clear that much of the whimbrels’ rest stop was under water. "What's left? Maybe 10 or 15 acres." Crolley guessed.

The reasons for Deveaux's disappearing act are many: the natural flux of sandbars at a river inlet; brutal storms, including Hurricane Idalia and last December’s nor’easter; rising tides from a rapidly warming planet.

Add these natural and climate change factors to increasing coastal development, and you have what Crolley called the "coastal squeeze.”

Which is why he and other conservationists are frustrated and angry that the state Department of Natural Resources has declined to close what’s left of Deveaux Bank.

Other coastal shorebird sanctuaries, including Charleston’s Crab Bank, are off limits during nesting season.

“Why isn’t Deveaux?” Crolley asked the group.

Other SC bird sanctuaries are closed

Part of the answer was back on shore in Rockville.

The town’s mayor, Riley Bradham, said Deveaux has long been a favored fishing and beachcombing spot. Access to Deveaux is part of Wadmalaw’s cultural heritage, he said, adding that he and residents also are acutely aware that people can harm birds merely by their presence. Getting too close can create “flares,” disturbances that cause birds to flee their nests. This opens them to predatory gulls or the sun’s heat, which can cook eggs or newly hatched chicks in minutes. “It’s a balancing act,” he said of DNR’s management.

Part of the answer is even farther inland, in DNR’s offices, where staff “try to do what’s best for the birds, while trying to balance that with public use and enjoyment of the area,” said Emily Cope, deputy director of wildlife and freshwater fisheries.

Still, when asked for specific metrics used to balance these interests, the agency had trouble coming up with them. How much high ground is left on Deveaux? The agency's latest calculation was made eight months ago after Hurricane Idalia spun past the coast and left behind just 22 acres of high ground.

At the same time, officials are clearer about the sanctuary’s importance, noting how last year Deveaux Bank hosted more than 3,000 pelican nests, roughly three-quarters of the state’s nesting pelican population and the largest colony on the Atlantic coast. They noted how in recent weeks they'd seen terns and black skimmers flying low over the island, scouting for stretches of sand to nest.

And, they said that so much of Deveaux is under water from mid tide to high tide that the agency can't post off-limits signs in some areas. Instead, the agency is depending on people to abide by what's in a new map.

The map shows what's open — the bank’s southern corner — and what's closed. Dogs aren’t allowed no matter where you go, and violators can be fined $465.

To some conservationists, the agency’s actions seem like futile contortions.

Dana Beach, a longtime conservationist, said he remembered the island once had trees. Not anymore. “When Deveaux was larger, opening it had an impact on the shorebirds, but it wasn’t an existential impact. So DNR’s attitude now is bizarre and mostly inexplicable.”

Riley Egger of the Coastal Conservation League said that last week she saw more than 3,000 red knots in the area, and that later she saw four boats anchored in the same spot. "Shorebirds are declining faster than any other group of birds partly because humans increasingly use their habitats," she said. "Deveaux Bank is a site of international importance."

Back on the boat, Crolley rattled off the names of the state’s shorebird sanctuaries: Tomkins Island toward Savannah, Deveaux Bank, Bird Key Stono and Charleston Harbor’s Crab Bank.

“They’re all protected, except Deveaux.” He pointed toward Rockville. “Because someone over there thinks it's a good fishing spot.”

Seeing the whimbrels

Conservationists say Deveaux Bank is so important the state should even consider renourishing it, as it did with Crab Bank — an idea that DNR also has resisted.

Local groups are seeking a grant to study sand transport around Deveaux. They asked for DNR's comments. In response, the agency said it doesn’t support renourishing. “Deveaux is naturally dynamic and erodes and rebuilds," the agency said in a document obtained by The Post and Courier. “… Artificially placed sand would not stay put for long thus renourishing is not worth the effort and funds.”

State Sen. Chip Campsen, R-Isle of Palms, said he’s long known about the importance of protecting Deveaux, and that a renourishment project shouldn’t be ruled out. He’d fought for more enforcement of existing closure rules in the past, especially during the pandemic, when more people seemed to treat the island as just another beach spot. “We had folks who weren’t respectful of the boundaries,” he said. Given its diminished size, “should it be totally closed now? I think we should take a hard look at that.”

On that recent evening trip to Deveaux, the sun set as Crolley slowed near the southwestern tip, the spot where people can legally land their boats and walk around.

The moon was higher now. In the twilight, the western sky glowed pinkish orange.

The birders hoisted their cameras and pointed them toward the sand and ridge of waist-high dunes. A breeze carried a symphony of squawks and whistles and chirps. The smell of bird dung grew stronger. Birds were everywhere, pelicans crammed into the dunes, black skimmers and whimbrels lifting off like confetti swept by gusts. “They look like bees!” Crolley said. Thousands and thousands of birds. All on this shrinking patch of sand.

Code enforcement reports show violations of short-term rentals on Seabrook Island

SEABROOK ISLAND, S.C. (WCSC) - The debate on short-term rentals continues on Seabrook Island as the special committee met with code enforcement and the property owner’s association to see how much of a burden short-term rentals are causing them.The purpose of the committee is to study short-term rental activities and trends within the town. This could involve limiting the number of...

SEABROOK ISLAND, S.C. (WCSC) - The debate on short-term rentals continues on Seabrook Island as the special committee met with code enforcement and the property owner’s association to see how much of a burden short-term rentals are causing them.

The purpose of the committee is to study short-term rental activities and trends within the town. This could involve limiting the number of short-term rentals, limiting the ownership of multiple short-term rentals, what fees are reasonable, etc.

Seabrook Island is home to 2,345 family homes and villas and 588 of those are short-term rentals, according to the town.

Town councilman Darryl May, who’s also the chair of the committee, said they have heard over 450 comments both written and at the public forums.

He said they show how divided the island really is over whether or not to cap the number or push any more enforcement.

“There probably should be better enforcement of our rules, nuisance-type rules, on the island,” May said. “More understandable enforcement. Things of that nature.”

Town of Seabrook Island Mayor Bruce Kleinman said one of the main takeaways for him was that people are assuming what they want is the opposite of what they think the committee will do. However, he said there’s just no way of knowing that without an outcome and people need to be patient with the process.

“The process is working,” Kleinman said. “I think people in the town need to be a little patient.”

Members of the town’s code enforcement team presented their findings over the last nine months of alleged and identified violations during Wednesday’s meeting.

They found that only 7% of the identified coming from STRs. However, town administrator Joseph Cronin says some of the nuisance violations could overlap.

“There’s probably more violations that are out there,” Cronin said. “But if it’s not reported to us, it’s not observed by us, it’s obviously not going to be reflected in our data.”

Short-term rentals have 27 out of the 378 total found violations. Out of those, just over half came from vehicles parked in a yard or landscape area. The next most were overnight occupancy exceeding the permitted amount. Three violations were found for advertising a non-permitted short-term rental unit.

The team said if they discover a short-term rental has three violations, which they either admitted to or were found guilty in court, they can be suspended. Only then can the town revoke its short-term rental license.

“We felt like that was a little too lenient,” Cronin said. “...A couple incidences where we thought it may be more appropriate to be able to take more dramatic action earlier.”

He said there’s another idea.

“Three violations could be immediate revocation,” Cronin said.

May say he’s heard the argument that STRs lead to people wanting to move full-time to the island. But both he and Kleinman also understand that nuisances, like trash and noise, can be a big deterrent.

The committee has several more meetings before they take their recommendations to the town council which gives the final approval. The goal is to wrap this up by the end of June.

“Even if it isn’t what each Seabrooker hoped for, it will at least be a result that they perceive was reached in a fair way,” Kleinman said.

For the full list of code enforcement violations over the past nine months, read below.

STR Committee Information - 03-20-2023 by Live 5 News on Scribd

Copyright 2024 WCSC. All rights reserved.

First-ever committee addresses Seabrook Island short-term rentals

SEABROOK ISLAND, S.C. (WCSC) - A first-time special committee on short-term rentals is hearing Seabrook Island residents’ concerns and hopes for the island’s future.The Seabrook Island Town Council established a Special Committee on Short-Term Rentals on Jan. 4 with the members being appointed on Jan. 23.The committee’s purpose is to study short-term rental activities and trends within the town. This could involve limiting the number of short-term rentals, limiting the ownership of multiple short-term rentals,...

SEABROOK ISLAND, S.C. (WCSC) - A first-time special committee on short-term rentals is hearing Seabrook Island residents’ concerns and hopes for the island’s future.

The Seabrook Island Town Council established a Special Committee on Short-Term Rentals on Jan. 4 with the members being appointed on Jan. 23.

The committee’s purpose is to study short-term rental activities and trends within the town. This could involve limiting the number of short-term rentals, limiting the ownership of multiple short-term rentals, what fees are reasonable, etc.

Seabrook Island is home to 2,345 family homes and villas and 588 of those are short-term rentals, according to the town.

With about 25% of the island being taken up by short-term rentals, some residents say there are issues that need to be addressed.

“Agitating alligators,” Seabrook Island resident John Lagna said during Wednesday’s first public forum. “Secondly, speeding. Thirdly, ignoring stop signs... Lastly, ignoring amenity rules.”

However, not everyone agrees.

“There are a number of factors that have entered into it, but short-term rentals seem to be an easy target,” resident Debra Hardick said.

The committee says they are referencing data from peak COVID-19 times from when the number of renters significantly increased.

Resident Paul McLaughlin says the growth of the island has impacted the overall sense of community.

“If you don’t know who your neighbors are, it’s just not a very good feeling,” McLaughlin said.

The committee is made up of a town councilman, homeowners and even short-term rental owners who have been on the island for around a decade or more. They say the town has previously had an Ad Hoc Committee to address this topic, which was allowed to be done privately, but they want this one to be public to increase transparency.

Darryl May is the only town councilman on the short-term rental committee while the other seven are residents.

“So, the goal of this committee is to develop a set of proposals for the town council to pass an ordinance,” May said.

During the public forum, some shared ideas for what that ordinance may or may not look like.

“I think we should allow renters,” resident Ann Laporte said. “I think we should allow a minimum of three nights. No more than that.”

Resident Bill Boissonalt has another idea, adding that the town shouldn’t still be referencing data from peak COVID in 2020.

“I just don’t believe that we need any new regulations regarding the overnight stay, the capped rentals, based on history,” Boissonalt said.

As far as what the committee thinks the ordinance could look like, May says he doesn’t want to jump the gun.

“I won’t hazard to guess because we’re just starting out this process and we want to have a very open mind,” May said. “But we do anticipate getting an ordinance by about June.”

There are still three more public hearings over the next two weeks and the committee encourages Seabrook Island residents and those who rent on the island to speak.

Click here to read more about past short-term rental data and sign up for public comment.

Read below for the details on the next three public forums:

Public Forum #2

Public Forum #3

Public Forum #4

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Editorial: Seabrook Island, other beach towns, should respect Johns Island growth boundary

There are several powerful reasons why Seabrook Island Town Council should reject a proposed annexation that would pave the way for a new boat dock, private clubhouse, boathouse, pool house and 10 rental cottages near the town's northern limits.The additional boat and car traffic would create more congestion on Betsy Kerrison Parkway in particular and Johns Island in general, as well as more pollution to the otherwise pristine Bohicket Creek. But the biggest reason Town Council should reject the 18-acre annexation is the dangerous pre...

There are several powerful reasons why Seabrook Island Town Council should reject a proposed annexation that would pave the way for a new boat dock, private clubhouse, boathouse, pool house and 10 rental cottages near the town's northern limits.

The additional boat and car traffic would create more congestion on Betsy Kerrison Parkway in particular and Johns Island in general, as well as more pollution to the otherwise pristine Bohicket Creek. But the biggest reason Town Council should reject the 18-acre annexation is the dangerous precedent it would set, a precedent that would erode the rural character of southern Johns Island.

Decades ago, local governments, led by the city of Charleston and Charleston County, agreed on an urban growth boundary across Johns Island and other areas. The big idea was to ensure their zoning and other policies were synchronized to allow suburban development to continue to spread, but only up to a point, beyond which the existing rural nature would be preserved. The boundary has generally worked well, but as with so much other conservation work, it needs to be embraced and reaffirmed by each new generation.

Seabrook Island's potential move would mark one of the first and most dramatic annexations by a municipality into the rural portion of the island; if it succeeds, it almost assuredly wouldn't be the last, and it could hasten the unraveling of the boundary line — and increase development pressures on the shrinking amount of land on the rural side of the boundary.

Robby Maynor of the Coastal Conservation League agrees that annexing and rezoning this property on the rural side of the urban growth boundary would set a disastrous precedent on the county's Sea Islands and could lead to annexation battles such as those that are playing out along the most rural stretches of the upper Ashley River, whose rural historic district remains in jeopardy from encroaching homes, stores and the traffic they bring. Approving the marina project would be "like kicking an anthill and hoping you don't get bit," he says.

The case that the property's owner and other supporters have made for the annexation is that it would give Seabrook Island future control of the site and limit future development there, according to reporter Warren Wise. But the proposal appears to us as designed to facilitate development, not to curb it. Annexing the site, which is next to Bohicket Marina, would allow it to tie into the town's sewer system.

Unfortunately, Seabrook Island's Planning Commission has recommended annexing the site and rezoning it for a mixed-used development. We urge Town Council members to reject that move when they consider the matter Aug. 22.

As Mr. Wise noted, the project is a scaled-down version of a 30-year-old Andell Harbor project that state environmental regulators rightly and mercifully rejected. While this is smaller, with only about 4 acres of development near the creek and the rest set aside for open space, it still would represent an unwelcome and disturbing encroachment into the rural area between the barrier islands of Kiawah and Seabrook and the suburban growth from the city of Charleston.

Last year, we urged elected officials, neighborhood leaders and planners with Charleston County and the two beach towns to come up with a mutually agreed-upon overlay for their shared area at the southern tip of Johns Island. That overlay should guide future development toward the kinds of uses — and the sizes and scale — residents of all three jurisdictions would most like to see, and help address growing real estate pressures in a way residents prefer. We repeat the call for regional cooperation, and Seabrook Island's rejection of this annexation would be an important first step.

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